Welcome to Sustaining The Wild Coast

"Development is the progress made by communities through sharing of different views on what should be done within the community to benefit the entire members of that particular community.It is a process in which a community of people strives to make it possible for all members to satisfy their fundamental human needs and improve the quality of their lives without damaging the environment or minimize the damage to the environment." (Definition agreed at a workshop of local people in the Amadiba Tribal Authority)


"This field is my bank for university fees. White people go to banks in buildings but, for us, our land is our bank. With the money I make from selling madumbies and mealies in Durban I will be able to pay for my son's university fees."


"One day the police came to my house and wanted to take me to the police station. Before I would have gone with them though I knew I had done nothing wrong and that they were going to beat me up and then let me go. I was scared but this time, because Simbhademe had taught me about the constitution and my human rights, I asked them to tell me what I had done wrong and for the arrest warrant. I could see they were surprised and shocked. They could not answer me and so got into their car and drove off. They have not come back to the village to trouble us again."


"When you've only got one lamp, the light is rather dim and so it's useless when you are walking in the dark. It was so dark I never thought there would be any sunshine but we kept moving forward with a dimmed lamp. With a paraffin lamp you need to be adding to it all the time if it's going to burn. Today we have electricity and a long-life globe. Simbhademe brought me and all of us the light. We'll be strong, keep up the good work and bring more information for the people."


"The Pondo people are born environmentalists. We do not go to school to learn to become environmentalists. We are born that way."


"The government is coming to us like someone with 'itchy armpits'. They must scratch where we are itching, not their own itchy armpits. Our roads that we have to use to get to town are mostly just cattle paths. They must close their armpits and listen to us, and fix our roads."